What Is the Difference Between Hard and Soft Water?

By September 24, 2019 blog, news, Uncategorized

What Is Soft Water?

When there is a low concentration of ions, particularly magnesium and calcium, in the water, it is known as soft water. Where you live depends on what water ends up classified as soft. In the US, water with 60 mg/l of calcium carbonate is considered soft.

Soft water lacks minerals, making it unsuitable for consuming, however this lack of minerals can be beneficial in other ways. Soft water cleans better without leaving behind the residue found in hard water, and the same goes for your skin. Soft water is better on your skin, leaving it cleaner and softer.

What Is Hard Water?

Hard water is simply water with high mineral content. Hard water forms when water percolates through limestone and chalk deposits. Due to the high mineral content, drinking hard water can have health benefits such as combating, and even preventing, heart disease. Hard water picks up minerals in natural waterways.

Hard water can also have negative effects. For instance, hard water may leave clothes looking dingy, your dishes with spots, and may even dry out your skin. Due to the residue left behind by hard water, it will often decrease the lifespan of your appliances, such as a dishwasher and washing machine. Hard water also uses up more energy, negatively affecting the environment as well as your energy bill.

What Is the Difference?

The main difference is the mineral content. Rainwater is soft water, whereas hard water is water that goes through waterways and picks up minerals. They both have their own sets of pros and cons, for example, hard water is great for drinking and certain disease prevention, but not so great for household cleaning or keeping your skin soft. Soft water may be better for keeping your skin soft and your dishes clean, but when it comes to drinking it, it can lead to several health issues.

Understanding the difference between hard water and soft water can help you make decisions for your own home. To learn more about the two types, and what you can do about the water in your home, contact Chesapeake Geosystems. Call 410-489-1712 or email us today

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